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  • CISO Editorial

Are you on the ego-driven or mission-driven side?

When it comes to making decisions, it's important to consider whether you are being driven by your own ego or a greater mission. While both can be powerful motivators, they lead to very different outcomes and paths.


If you're ego-driven, then the decision is often based on what will give you a short-term gratification—like bragging rights, material gain, or control. This can be a powerful motivator, but it tends to lead to decisions that are ultimately self-serving and not in the best interest of anyone else involved.


On the other hand, if you're mission-driven, then you make decisions based on what will achieve a greater good—like alignment to your values, service to others, or creating a lasting legacy. This may result in more challenging decisions that require sacrifice and hard work, but they will also bring more meaningful rewards.


A common trait that differentiates mission driven vs ego driven:


Mission driven traits are more focused on micromanaging the work that matter for the customer, you don't judge the people, you judge the work and critique the work that people do and really standing up for the best that is in favour of your customer experience and end goal.


Ultimately, it's up to you which type of motivation you choose when making decisions. But if you want to create something greater than yourself and make a lasting impact, it's wise to choose mission over ego.

Good decision-making has the power to shape your life and career. So choose wisely, and remember that sometimes brief moments of gratification don't have nearly as much impact as longer-term missions.


Examples of ego driven and mission driven:


Examples of mission driven people would be activists, entrepreneurs, philanthropists or people who work for non-profit organizations. They are motivated by a cause rather than personal gain and often make decisions based on what will benefit their chosen mission.

Examples of ego driven people might include those who prioritize success in all areas of their lives including career, relationships, wealth and social standing over other people's opinions and well-being. They may make decisions that result in personal gain but not necessarily in the best interest of their surrounding community.


Examples of ego-driven people might include those who prioritize success in all areas of their lives including career, relationships, wealth and social standing over other people's opinions and well-being. They may make decisions that result in personal gain but not necessarily in the best interest of their surrounding community.

At the end of the day, it’s important to consider why you're making a decision in the first place. If it’s driven by ego, you might receive short-term gratification but not experience true satisfaction or create lasting impact. If it’s mission-driven, however, then it could lead to greater meaning and contribute something more meaningful to the world.

No matter which route we choose, always remember to think before responding and be aware of the bigger picture. Good luck!

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